Stanley Register Online Cars of Record: Preservation
8

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Last update:
3/1/13


Some Stanleys have been around for quite a long time.
In some cases, they've been in the continuous care of hobbyists and preservationists for half a century or more.
The very special cars on this page have been basically untouched since they were put away by their last regular users.
In some cases they've undergone enough mechanical repair to operate, but cosmetically they're substantially untouched,
    and retain parts, surfaces, and finishes that were delivered from the Stanley factory.
They are historical documents which, although they may have been modified and repaired by their early owners,
    reveal factory practices, materials, and finishing techniques in a way that period catalogs cannot.

chassis
1305

engine


model
CX

body
runabout

image source - Webshots, pparrish1

The history of this car is known since new.
It was purchased in 1980 by the Bourdon brothers, Don and Curt, from the family of the original owner, Albert Worthen.
It has not been opoerated since 1912.
The Bourdons preserved it carefully, sellnig it to another preserver, who sold it at auction to an antique car broker.
It remains for sale in Rhode Island.

chassis
1511

engine


model
G

body
runabout

image source - www.StanleySteamers.com

Little historical information is available on this car, other than it was found by Clarence Lintz some time before 1954.
One of the earliest coffin-nosed cars remaining, it resides in New Hampshire.

chassis
4089

engine


model
K

body
semi racer

image source - Steampunk Workshop

This legendary car was purchased new by W. S. Libbey of Wayne, Maine.
Its outstanding performance was recalled in a 1929 newspaper article by someone who rode in it frequently.
60 mph was loafing, and 80 was in reach.
Remarkably, it remained in the Libbey family until purchased by Richard Paine for his Seal Cove Auto Museum.
It remains in the musem today, unrestored, an irreplaceable historic document.

chassis
4620

engine
C02088

model
E2

body
runabout

image source - Concept Carz

Antique car broker Charles LeMaitre discovered this gem.
He sold it to David Ault, who carefully preserved its exterior condition, and made it operational.
Ault sold it to John Moir, who used  it as "S" in his collection of cars with names from A to Z.
With some mechanical help from the Stanley Museum, Moir displayed it at Amelia Island's 2006 steam extravaganza/
It was auctioned in 2009 and is now located in the JWR Auto Museum in Pennsylvania.

chassis
5148

engine


model
60

body
runabout

image source - current owner

This is one of the last unaltered remnants of the many '40s and '50s barn finds of Mervin Allatt.
Still unaltered, this car is in Michigan and awaiting a new owner, as of this writing.  (See http://www.stanleysteamers.com/forsale.htm .)

chassis
5239

engine


model
60

body
runabout

image source - Tim Martin

Edwin Battison was a Stanley enthusiast as early as the 1940s.  (See also #479.)
He was a dedicated car seeker and researcher.
In addition to finding the Lcomobile with serial number plate #1, and one of the few remaining  chain-drive Stanleys. #134,
    he acquired this original Model 60, and preserved it.
It remains with his effects in the collection of the Franklin Museum.

chassis
7164

engine
6-1095

model
64

body
roadster

image source - personal collection

This car was purchased from its original owner in 1939 by James Kuhn.
This may be the most active of all the cars on this page.
Its Florida owner regularly drives it on steam tours, and continues to reinforce aging parts and apply TLC.

chassis
link

engine


model
65

body
touring

image source - advertisement

No history or serial number is available for this car, but it is clearly one which hasn't been touched in many decades.
It is located in California.

chassis
7646

engine


model
606

body
roadster

image source - StanleySteamers.com

This car, found and stored for many years by early Stanley hunter Mervin Allatt, has been given just the mechanical attention needed to be operable.
Here is is, exposing its historic original surfaces to the downpour that characterized the monumental 1999 Mt. Washington Centennial gathering.
The car now resides in New Hampshire.




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