Stanley Register Online Cars of Record: Pre-1950
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Last update:
4/3/16


Some Stanleys have been around for quite a long time.
In some cases, they've been in the continuous care of hobbyists and preservationists for more than half a century.
The cars on this page are some of the ones which have with us the longest.
These photos celebrate cars which exist today but have been enjoyed for many years.

chassis
link

engine



model


body
runabout

image source - eBay

Roy Monsen, very early Chicago collector of very early cars, looks pleased to have found this one.  The photograph was dated January 21, 1933.  
It is very likely the car pictured on the 1901 page of the Register.
Though it has a paneled seat, side-tiller steering, bow-truss axles, and single-curve front, it has long been labeled an early-production Stanley.
Monsen may have believed that this was the car hand-built by Carl Breer, but that is not the case..
It spent many years in a Florida collection before moving to Maine and then overseas.

chassis
146

engine
219

model
(Type A)

body
stick seat runabout

image source - Horseless Carriage Gazette, 1948, Vol 10 #4

In 1948, Leonard Colpitts of Ballard Vale, MA, advertised this very early car.
It was completely restored, and in view of its significance he asked the then-astronomical figure of $2800.
Today the car is still in Massachusetts and looks much like it did in this picture.

chassis
247

engine
71

model
(Type A)

body
stick seat runabout

image source - current owner

On Nov. 24, 1943, wire services carried this photo with a fanciful story of baseball Hall-of-Famer Joe Gordon and his wife still driving the car around Eugene, OR.  Joe was home from his berth with the Yankees to announce his plan to enlist.
The driving part of the story seems unlikely, given the condition of the right front tire.
However, the car went on to survive the WWII scrap drives, and today is completely restored and operational in California.
It's one of the very few short-wheelbase cars still in operation.
It still looks like this, but with fresh paint in the yellow color that was found as original paint.
Th early Oregon 2147 plate remains with the car.

chassis
479

engine


model
(Type B)

body
panel seat runabout

image source - Bulb Horn, Jul 1948

A youthful Ed Battison pilots his early tiller-steer car at the 1948 Charlemont steam car meet.
The following year he would drive this car to the top of Mt. Washington, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of F. O. & Flora Stanley's famous climb.
This car was restored some years ago to a high standard and won its class at Pebble Beach in 1997.
It now resides in New Hampshire.
(See also #5239.)

chassis
4161

engine
K-54

model
K

body
semi racer

image source - Tim Martin                                                                   image source - Bulb Horn, Winter 1960


image source - Bulb Horn, Oct 1944

Clinton Atkinson was perhaps the first true steam car hobbyist.
He had an "antique" tiller-steer Stanley in about 1910.
By the 1920s, he was collecting Stanleys and Whites, and kept them and ran them for decades.
The picture on the left is from 1919, when this Model K was only 11 years old.  
    This may be the earliest known picture of any currently existing Stanley.
Atkinson sold the car to Paul Bourdon, himself a significant collector in the 1940s, where the photo on the right was taken.
In the early 1940s, Bourdon sold the car to James Melton, who took it to Fred Marriott's shop for reconditioning,
    where George Monreau did much of the work.
Melton wanted it to be delivered, so Monreau simply drove it the 150+ miles from Newton to Weston, CT - trouble-free.
By 1944, it looked like the bottom photo.
Melton proudly displayed this car for many years in his museum in Hypoloxo, FL, printing thousands of postcards of it in different poses.
Then it travelled to Petit Jean Mountain, AR with much of the rest of  Melton's collection, to form the basis of the Rockefeller Collection.
It continued on to Harrah's collection, then passed through the stewardship of Brent Campbell to its current home in New Hampshire,
    where it continues to live up to the Stanleys' original catalog performance claims.
With its remarkable combination of desirable model, original body, and accompanying original engine,
    this is one of the most interesting Stanleys remaining.
See also Atkinson's #6524.

chassis
4520

engine


model
E2

body
4-pass

image source - unknown

Ralph Van Dine was one of a trio of well-known Stanley hunters in the '30s and '40s.
Here he is in a terrific original car, in a picture that appears to be advertising it for sale.
Joe Van Sciver bought it from him, and owned it by 1948, so this picture predates that year.
It was painted a startling shade of green, apparently by Van Sciver, and spent many years in a Florida museum.
Today it is in California.

chassis
4539

engine


model
E2

body
runabout

image source - Bulb Horn, Oct 1949

Early collector Glenn Gould began his antique car career by restoring this Model E2, acquired from a relative.
The car remains in his collection, housed at the Wells Auto Museum.

chassis
4973

engine
U131

model
R

body
roadster

image source - Bulb Horn, Fall 1959

Frank B. Ewing, of Rapid City, SD, bought this Model R in 1927.
By the 1930s, he was using it as a service car for his auto repair business, the plank bumper used to push inoperative vehicles.
A friend of Smith Hempstone Oliver snapped this picture at that time.
By 1959, Ewing had refreshed the car, painting it, removing the bumper, and re-mounting the gas lights.
Today it resides in CT, serving as the pattern for many Model R re-creations.

chassis
5131

engine


model
62

body
runabout

image source - Horseless Carriage Club Gazette, Jul-Aug 2014

Californian Art Twohy, one of the founders of the Horseless Carriage Club of America, had this photo in his files.
Research on its license plate number revealed it to be #5131.
As early as 1954, it had made its way to the LA County Museum.
Carrying a different windshield today, the car is in a Nebraska museum, where it has resided for nearly 50 years.

chassis
5668

engine
7-38

model
70

body
5-pass

image source - Life magazine

This car was owned by Universal Studios for many years.
They put it to work in "Summer Holiday", starring Mickey Rooney, in 1948.
It also appeared in "The Vanishing Virginian".
Its current California owner has kept it in the spotlight by allowing it to be disassembled on-screen in "Seabiscuit".

chassis
5717

engine


model
71

body
demi-t

image source - Bulb Horn, Jul 1949

Renowned Stanley hunter Mervin Allatt located this fine original car and brokered it to T. Clarence Marshall in 1945.
Marshall had it restored by Hyde Ballard & Dick French.
Here's Tom Marshall with the car on the 1947 Glidden Tour.
It was restored again in 1998 by Charlie Johnson, and remains in the Marshall Collection today.

chassis
link

engine


model
60

body
runabout

image source - personal collection

This 8x10 glossy was taken at James Melton's first location in Norwalk, CT, before the collection moved to grander quarters in Florida.
Showing the car as Melton restored it, it's the original of the photo appearing in a souvenir book published about 1946.
Notice the pilot tank from a Model 735.
Today the car resides in the Smithsonian, although it is not displayed.

chassis
5781

engine
7-226

model
71

body
Toy Tonn.

image source - personal collection

Melton also acquired and restored this nice 4-passenger touring car, painting it in the curious light/dark paint scheme that he used on #3719.
Tom Marshall recalls that when his father purchased from Melton it in the early '50s, it still had the canvas windshield shown here.
This photo is from a set of small images sold as a souvenir from Melton's Norwalk location in the '40s.
After passing through several other hands, its current owner performed a careful restoration and the car is still active today.

chassis
6052

engine
8-31

model
special

body
roadster

image source - Pathfinder news weekly, Oct 30, 1944

Eccentric steam aficionado Oscar D. York, of Wolfeboro, NH, fitted Ray Stanley's second personal special roadster
    with a coal burner (and a roof and windshield) and used it for transportation during World War II.
Restored by Glenn Gould, and again under the stewardship of Brent Campbell, the Special once more has its original appearance and performance.

chassis
6066

engine


model
63

body
Toy Tonn.

image source - unknown

Leonard Taylor is absolutely howling around the Silverstone track in 1949 - note the position of the throttle lever.
Apparently he had removed the rear of the body, as this car today carries a touring car body with English front doors and windshield.

chassis
6069

engine


model
63

body
Toy Tonn.

image source - unknown

On the far left of this photo, taken at the 1940 Raceland meet of the VMCCA, is Cameron Bradley's Model 63, recently acquired from J. D. Bean..
The car ended up in Henry Austin Clark's Long Island Automotive Museum for many years, posing for one of Austie's well-known postcards.
After surviving intact for many years, it had much of its factory-delivered content discarded in the '80s - body, engine, original-sized boiler, brakes.
Today it is in a Michigan museum.

chassis
6164

engine


model
70

body
Touring

image source - eBay

This was steam fanatic James Melton's favorite Stanley.  He took it to many steam meets and was regularly photographed in the car.
A very photogenic Melton and wife appear in this 1944 photo - note the wartime fuel rationing sticker on the windshield.
The car went to the Winthrop Rockefeller Museum when that entity purchased most of Melton's collection after he fell on hard times.
Today it continues to be driven driven regularly in Illinois.

chassis
6208

engine


model
63

body
toy tonn

image source - Bulb Horn, Jan 1946

Henry C. Wing, Sr., was a vigorous early collector of Stanleys and other antiques, as was his son Henry C. Wing, Jr.
Here's Wing, Sr. at a 1945 or 1946 meet of the VMCCA at Greenfield.
Today this car is part of the collection in the Seal Cove Auto Museum.

chassis
6373

engine


model
62

body
demi-t

image source - unknown

Paul Bourdon was one of the earliest Stanley enthusiasts, beginning his first search for one in 1930.
A few years later, he found this car.  
Soon he had fitted a 20hp boiler and burner, requiring some frame modification but resulting in a very satisfactory highway car.
In 1939, with the car wearing this license plate, he drove it from his Vermont home to the 1939 World's Fai in New York,
    in the company of his wife, brother Bob and his wife, and a fifth person.
He drove the return trip, between three and four hundred miles, in one day, only needing stops for fuel and water.
Today the car remains in the family, on its original-specification frame, but still carrying a larger-than-standard boiler.

chassis
6379

engine


model
63

body
demi-t

image source - Marshall Collection

This very early photo of this smart Model 63, taken in front of the arbor behind T. Clarence Marshall's home,
    is labeled on the rear, in his handwriting, "Prize Winner Kennett Sw. Penna Hobby Show. Sept 7-8,1945"
Marshall purchased it in 1944.
In 1980, it was traded to its present owner in Delaware in return for paint work on other Marshall Collection cars.

chassis
6463

engine
475

model
73

body
5-pass

image source - HCC Gazette, 1949 No. 4

Elmer Norbury began appearing in the Horseless Carriage Club Gazette in California meets in 1949.
The car gradually made its way east, including a sojourn with the ubiquitous Carl Amsley,
    before arriving at its present-day owner's home in Canada.

chassis
6524

engine


model
87

body
7-pass

image source - eBay

Pioneering steam car hobbyist Clinton Atkinson located this rare and magnificent Model 87 as a young man.
Here it wears a 1920 New Hampshire license plate and supports a relaxed Atkinson on the running board.
Later owned and restored by Paul Bourdon, it was purchased in 1950 by T. Clarence Marshall.
It has travelled cross-country several times.  It remains in the Marshall Collection, and is operated regularly.
See also Atkinson's #4161.

chassis
6889

engine


model
76

body
5-pass

image source - Antique Automobile, 1946, Vol 10 No 3-4

In 1940, T Clarence Marshall became interested in finding a Stanley to enjoy.
Just a few miles from his house lay this car, in the hands of its original owner, to whom Marshall had sold the car new as a Stanley dealer.
Its purchase and refurbishment began a tradition of Stanley collection and knowledge sharing which remains unbroken over 70 years later.
Still in the Marshall Collection, having been housed no further than a 5-mile radius since it was new in 1913,
    this car is today one of the workhorses of the Friends of Auburn Heights Preserve.
It is in constant use all summer long, giving rides on the grounds, driving to nearby shows, and serving as the collection's ambassador on steam tours.
We see it here with a 1942 Delaware license plate.

chassis
7020

engine
6-993

model
65

body
4-pass

image source - personal collection

George Monreau worked on Stanley repair & restoration for many years, in association with Fred Marriott.
He also owned several Stanleys; here he is in "McGee", one of his favorites, at the 1947 Raceland meet of the VMCCA.
A very similar car, #6923, also owned by Monreau, went to early west coast collector Herb Royston, but eventually returned to the east.
Later owned by Monreau's grandson Brent Campbell, this car now resides in Washington state.

chassis
7163

engine
6-1089

model
64

body
roadster

image source - personal collection

One of Henry C. Wing's many Stanleys is shown here at the VMCCA's 1948 Raceland meet.
The curious electric headlights remained on the car for many years during Ralph Van Dine's ownership.
Today the car, fully restored again and with authentic headlights and a distinctive color, lives and drives in New Jersey.

chassis
link

engine
1106

model
64

body
roadster

image source - Marshall Collection

Henry C. Wing, Jr. found this car about 1940 in a local junk yard..  a feat never more to be repeated, I'm sure.
He restored it beautifully, as shown in this picture dated 1943.
Today it is in California.

chassis
7367

engine


model
65

body
touring

image source - Bulb Horn, Winter 1960

As yet unaware that Japanese war planes had bombed Pearl Harbor just a few hours earlier,
    a delighted Frank Gardner gets his new Stanley, just purchased from Paul Bourdon, into position for loading.
Frank is on the left, Paul Bourdon in the center, and Paul's brother Robert is on the right.
Stored during the war, the car was driven briefly in 1946, then Gardner upgraded to 20hp #6520.
This car then it passed through some other hands in quick succession, landing in the Swigart Museum in 1950.
It has acquired very few additional miles in the last 60+ years.

chassis
7480

engine
6-433

model
606

body
roadster

image source - Pat Farrell

The LA Daily News ran an article with this photo in 1944.
Newt Brown, pictured, was running this car on kerosene with blithe unconcern for rationing.
(Kerosene actually was rationed during the war, but not as stringently as gasoline.)
He fitted a condenser and a smokestack, but the remaining lines of the 606 are unmistakeable.
Dean Spencer restored the car in 1956, and "Sssteamer" Pat Farrell now drives the socks off of it in Washington state and points east.

chassis
7517

engine


model
710

body
5-pass

image source - Bulb Horn, Jul 1948

In the center of this photo from the first steam car meet at Charlemont, MA in 1948, is Henry C. Wing, Sr.'s remarkable Model 710.
(On the right is Stanley Ellis's #7781, and partially hidden behind Wing's car is Tom Marshall's #7742.)
This is one of only 4 20hp cars to survive from the 1914 model year.
It is still driven today, on the roads of Michigan.

chassis
7712

engine
6-1316

model
607

body
touring

image source - Mervin Allatt papers, courtesy of Jay Williams

This photo is labeled "Jen & Violet in Stanley / Dec. 1942".
In an odd twist, legendary Stanley broker Mervin Allatt appears to have had this car brokered to him, in 1936.
And by no less than the American Steam Automobile Co., the business manifestation of steam designer Thomas Derr.
Allatt clearly wanted this car for his own use, and went on to register it in NJ in 1937, '40, and '42.
He appears to have painted it during that time, as the 1937 registration describes the car as green,
    and the 1940 registration says blue.
Today the car is freshly restored and in Maine.

chassis
7742

engine


model
607

body
4-pass

image source - Bulb Horn, Jul 1948

By the time Tom Marshall returned from military service in 1945, his father, T. Clarence Marshall, had assembled a significant collection of Stanleys.
Tom was as fascinated as the rest of us, and acquired this car from Donald Randall.
It is actually mentioned in George Woodbury's book, The Story of a Stanley Steamer, driven by "Professor Coates"'s wife.
Here Tom is driving it at the very first steam car meet, at Charlemont, MA in 1948, with T. C. just behind him in #6889.
Tom put many miles on the car driving to meets and tours in the '40s and '50s.
Still in the Marshall Collection, it is in the final stages of a 4-year restoration, using volunteer labor.
It will return to regular road service in support of the educational mission of the Friends of Auburn Heights Preserve.

chassis
7769

engine
735-2156

model
712

body
roadster

image source - unknown

This may be the earliest known photo of one of the most photographed Stanleys of all.
Earle Eckel had already had this car for 17 years by the time of this shot, taken at the 1935 Philadelphia Antique Auto Derby,
    one of the formative events of the Antique Automobile Club of America.
He modified the wheels for the heavier tires shown here, and at some point,
    replaced the 1914 engine and rear end with components from a Model 735.
This combination took him down the road tens of thousands of miles, touring and driving to meets all over the eastern half of the US.
His expertise, sharing, and presence everywhere, made him (along with T. Clarence Marshall) one of the "Deans of Steam."
Presently residing in Massachusetts, and still wearing its condensing underpinnings,
    the car is now receiving some TLC from Don Bourdon and Brent Campbell.

chassis
7781

engine
6-957

model
607

body
touring

image source - Bulb Horn, Oct 1944

Here's Battison in his well turned-out 607 as the war drew to a close.
The VMCCA logo on the hood survived into Stanley Ellis's ownership and is visible in Ellis's book Smogless Days.
This car presently lives in Illinois and is driven regularly and energetically.

chassis
15037

engine



model
820

body
mtn wagon

image source - eBay

T. C. Marshall purchased the only 5-seat Mountain Wagon from George Monreau in 1946.
Son Tom drove it home to Delaware from Massachusetts.
It was just the first of many long trips and tours for this largest of Stanleys.
An unknown bystander snapped this photo of the car on the 1948 Glidden Tour.
Having had the pleasure of driving this wonderfuil car, I can attest that it is graceful, well-mannered, and powerful.
    It doesn't feel like a large vehicle at all.
It remains in the Marshall Collection, and you can come take a ride in it the first Sunday afternoon of every summer month.

chassis
15048

engine


model
720

body
touring

image source - eBay

Mervin Allatt covered many miles of many back roads of many states,
    in his search for Stanleys during the days they could still be found regularly in barns.
He picked up lots of cars himself, and he brokered many more.
In this case, he was almost a miracle worker.
Leroy Benge's father had a Model 720 which he bought new from T. Clarence Marshall in 1915.
Benge was a good friend of T. C.'s, and in the mid-1940s, watching the Marshall Collection grow, he though he'd like to have a car, too.
He asked Allatt to find him one just like his dad's.
Now, Model 720 is one of the rarest Stanleys; only a few were made during the 1915 transition  year to the condenser.
Allatt found a Model 720, to order, one of possibly only two remaining, and Benge drove it for many years.
Here he is on the 1949 Glidden Tour.
This car is today in California.

chassis
15038

engine


model
820

body
mtn wagon
15038
image source - Sherry Saylor

In 1940, Sherriff Jesse Z. Feese, of Alma, NB, added this Mountain Wagon to his steam car collection, which already included 2 Whites.
James Melton became aware of it, and pestered Feese about it for several years, finally purchasing the car in 1944.
Melton restored the car and sold it in 1952 to T. Clarence Marshall.
It passed numerous other hands and presently resides in Michigan.




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